Why Classical Music and its Neurochemical Cascade is Good for People with Multiple Sclerosis

ballet dancers on stage merge in slow shutter effect
ballet dancers on stage merge in slow shutter effect
Photo by Ahmad Odeh on Unsplash

Classical music helps us make physical improvements

Jennifer Powell, A health writer with multiple sclerosis describes music as a “spiritual experience.” I completely agree.

neon sign reading ‘you are what you listen to’
neon sign reading ‘you are what you listen to’
Photo by Mohammad Metri on Unsplash

It gives catharsis and positive emotional experiences

Music is delivered via sound waves. When you listen to the sound waves of classical music, it produces dopamine. Classical music and its attendant dopamine elicit a positive emotional experience.

It helps thinking and memory

These emotional events modulate cognitive processes. Feeling relaxed and unstressed helps our thinking and memory. That is been shown in a number of studies, including this one.

It strengthens and protects our brains

If you were to put someone in a machine and scan them singing, large areas of their brains activate.

Photo by Todd Kent on Unsplash

It helps improve sleep and reduce depression

That blessed past-time. I love my sleep. Nine hours a night. Ten, if I can. I’m in bed around 8pm and the kids wake me up around six in the morning. Without it, the black dogs of depression start skulking my way. Let me just go ahead and link the two: depression and poor sleep.

video game of car driving
video game of car driving
Photo by João Ferrão un Unsplash

Freelance writer. Composer of short fiction. Novelist.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store